Sorted Corty

Ford Cortinas - and Getting Them to the States

Category: Knowledge

An Australian Attempt at a Fastback

It seems like the Aussies often got cool stuff. It must be attributable to the tough management of the local Ford subsidiary but they know their market, right? So perhaps it is the culture of Australians asserting their need to be different – and cooler than us yanks and brits. However in this case it didn’t work out. Now in Germany the Cortina’s sister car, the Tanus, did get a fastback model and the styling was excellent but no fastbacks in the UK or Australia despite this excellent attempt.

All images are the property of their respective owners and are not the property of sortedcorty.com.

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More Detail on Insurance

Peace of mind. That is what it comes down to – feeling like you’re protected. Not to sound like an insurance commercial (sortedcorty.com is not affiliated with any insurance company) but protecting your property is just common sense. When planning to ship your Cortina to the US there are a number of questions that will come to mind. What does cargo insurance cover? Cargo Insurance covers loss and/or damage of cargo while it is in transit between the points of origin and final destination. The transportation modes of the goods cargo insurance covers are by sea, air, and land.

All images are the property of their respective owners and are not the property of sortedcorty.com

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Even More Power and Performance!

Of the 2,894 Mark 1 Lotus Cortinas produced between 1963 and 1966, 64 were fitted with the Lotus Special Equipment package which further tweaked the power and performance of this already potent Ford. The engine upgrades included in this package were similar if not identical to those that were included when the Lotus Elan was specified with S/E trim. In fact many of the performance bits, such as the close-ratio gearbox, came from the Lotus parts bin to the extent that the motoring press at the time referred to the Lotus Cortina as a “tin-top” version of the Lotus 7. Beyond the single script nomenclature on the rear panel, the Lotus Special Equipment spec included a green coated cam cover that replaced the blue one present on the “standard” Lotus Cortina.

All images are the property of their owners and not the property of sortedcorty.com. Right image courtesy Bonhams.

The advertised engine output increased by 10 HP as a result of semi-race (‘C’ type) camshafts being fitted to a cylinder head that featured massaged intake and exhaust ports. Those modifications as well as an increased tubing diameter exhaust system necessitated the re-jetting of the twin Weber 40 DCOE18 carburettors and a re-curved distributor. Other parts of the package included adjustable rear dampers by Armstrong, 3-point seatbelts by Irvin, a leather-covered steering wheel and radial tires by either Pirelli or Dunlop.

They Got Cool Stripes Down Under

Ford of Australia got the Cortina GT just like the UK however in 1969 the GT was offered in a distinctive local version that featured the “racing stripe” package shown here. In addition to the contents of the GT package a blacked-out bonnet with lock pins was available but not shown on this example.

All images are the property of the seller or the marketing site and are not the property of sortedcorty.com.

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Some Detail on Cargo Insurance

International shipping, with the various options for transport as well as multiple passes through customs agencies, takes careful planning and a measure of trust. However even when the most prudent and comprehensive arrangements have been made there is no absolute guarantee that your cargo will arrive undamaged or even at all.

Please consult a cargo insurance specialist and do not consider this blog post as legal advice.

As they say – that is what insurance is for. Loss or damage can occur while the ship is in port, while the goods are in transit to the warehouse, or even while at the warehouse itself as well as while in transit on the ship. Insurance is big business and there are many types of policies and options available. There are a number of risks involved, such as fire, but you will want to make sure the policy you purchase covers the risks appropriate to your chosen transport method. Additionally as with most insurance types there are exclusions – certain conditions or events where the policy becomes basically inapplicable. You should think about these and be certain you are comfortable with them.

Universal Cargo has prepared a document Cargo Insurance Basics which is available from their blog post here.

Briefly – Roy Brown Jr., Car Designer

Designing and engineering vehicles for Ford in the States, Mr. Brown had been transferred to Ford’s British arm from Dearborn shortly after designing the Edsel. Yes, Roy Brown Jr. designed the Mk 1 Cortina – then moved back to the States where he eventually spent just shy of 40 years in retirement. There is a ton more to this story – from the life and times of an automotive designer in 1950s America to the drama around the fall of the Edsel to the artistic resurgence in England and the success there. What a phenomenal career. From a design perspective the Edsel was a triumph – from a marketing perspective the Cortina was as well.

1958 Edsel Pacer 2-Door hardtop © Lars-Göran Lindgren Sweden. Licensed under Creative Commons Licence 3.0.

There certainly is a radical difference in design language used between the Edsel and the Cortina – but if you look at the other cars Mr. Brown designed it is clear he was versatile with form and function. It seems he drove an Edsel late in life; I wonder if he had a Cortina.

You and the Law – International Law

International law concerning the transport of goods between countries is a complex subject; however the small slice of legislation you will be dealing with is digestible with the proper guidance. People import cars every day – in fact the folks you will be dealing with may assume you do – and knowing what you are doing will make their day less frustrating as well. Having the necessary knowledge will not only make the process go smoother it may save you money and time.  It will also make the whole experience more rewarding. Humans have been moving stuff around this planet practically since the dawn of time so as you can imagine there are many defined procedures and methods that have been in use for decades if not centuries.  Following the rules and selecting the most advantageous options will not only keep you out of trouble but ensure your vehicle makes it to its destination without undue hassle.

National Incoterms chambers © Copyright Alinor. Licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 3.0

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Some Helpful Tips on Choosing a Transportation Company

There is a significant amount of effort that goes into tracking down your next project – granted that effort, the hunt, is a cherished part of the experience. Once the target has been identified, transporting that project from its seemingly random location on the planet to your own workshop can take significant effort as well. There is no reason this effort cannot be rewarding or at least tolerable. Choosing a partner in this phase of acquisition is important because your choice can mean the difference between frustration and smooth sailing (pun intended).

ferry

© Copyright Richard Webb. Licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0.

Choosing the wrong company could result in hugely unexpected expenses, long delays, or even failure to receive your car at all.  Mary James from Pacific Tycoon, a major player in the container rental and investment industry, has written a guest post on Universal Cargo’s blog that provides some great tips on choosing the best company to ship your car. It’s a great place to start your adventure!

One of the Last of the Last

This Mark V, when sold at auction in 2012, had never been registered for road use in the UK. One of the last vehicles to be assembled for the 1981 model year, this Cherry Red GL was purchased by a collector who reportedly liked to acquire specimens of different vehicles from the last years of their production.

Image: HEMEDIA

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Briefly – The Ford Kent Engine

Born with the Anglia 105E in 1959, the 997cc Ford Kent engine (using contemporary designations) was an overhead-valve (OHV) inline 4-cylinder – with 2 valves per cylinder and 3 main bearings – cast in iron. Originally the cylinder head was fitted with both the intake and exhaust manifolds on the same side (intake and exhaust ports next to each other), which was declining in use at the time, however is important to the classification of the Kent engine. Kent is the name of an English county across the river Thames from the Ford Dagenham plant (east of London) where many Cortinas were built. This first “Kent” was utilized in 5 different Ford models (39-78 bhp) as well as in a few specialty vehicles; even in it’s initial guise the Kent provided an excellent base for motorsports applications.

diagram

After a redesign of the engine in 1967, which placed the intake and exhaust ports on opposite sides of the head, the Kent became alternatively known as the Ford Crossflow. The Crossflow also offered a sturdier block with 5 main bearings which delighted the racing teams who expanded their competition engine programmes with much success. This engine lived on for many years in both production and motorsports and as of 2016 the Kent block was still being manufactured by Ford for speciality applications.

So the Cortina was powered initially by the pre-Crossflow Kent or in the case of the Lotus Cortina the pre-Crossflow block, modified and transformed into the Lotus Twincam engine. The Mark 2 then debuted the Crossflow but also offered the pre-Crossflow Kent as well as the Lotus Twincam. When the Mark 3 debuted the pre-Crossflow was no longer available however the Pinto single overhead-cam (SOHC) engine appeared alongside the Crossflow. The Ford Crossflow (aka Ford Kent) engine was available in the Cortina for the remainder of its production.

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